All posts tagged: art

“Manguin” at the Hermitage captures hot Summer Days in vibrant Color

Just as the season for languid, lazy moments has arrived in the Swiss Romandy comes a new exhibition at the Hermitage Foundation in Lausanne that captures the very essence of hot summer days and nights. In Manguin: The voluptuousness of color we see some 100 works — paintings, sketches and watercolors — by the painter Henri Manguin (1874-1949) who indulged his passion for color so ardently the contemporary poet Apollinaire called him the “voluptuous painter”.

Pastels Hermitage exhibit

Pastels across Five Centuries at Lausanne’s Hermitage Foundation

Until 21st of May, the Fondation de l’Hermitage in Lausanne gives us a privileged look at the use of pastels across five centuries of art. Some 150 masterpieces from public and private collections in Switzerland — from early Renaissance masters to contemporary artists — give us a captivating look at this exceptional technique. Sometimes the word “pastel” when used in reference to the color of clothing, decor or makeup can conjure an image of the faded or wishy-washy for me. But seeing the effect of pastels in artworks, such as those now exhibiting in Pastels from 16th – 21st century at the Hermitage in Lausanne, I realize that pastel shades – even in the most subtle rendering — are anything but weak.

Dutch masters at domaine de Penthes

New Dutch Masters join Rembrandt at the Domaine de Penthes

To coincide with the stunning exhibition Rembrandt in Geneva at the Domaine de Penthes until 23 October,  Tête à Tête – Swiss Events has mounted a parallel exhibition entitled Dutch Art & Design, “Old Master, New Masters” which is featured at the Museum until Sunday, 25 September. The exhibition is of limited-edition works by photographer Hendrik Kerstens and designers Jurgen Bey, Joris Laarman and Marcel Wanders. It offers a contemporary vision of Dutch art  and design as created by these “New Masters”. In a dedicated room visitors can also watch biographical videos of the artists as well as “making of” videos of key works from the exhibition.

Rembrandt-in-Geneva

Rembrandt in Geneva: a hundred etchings that leave a lasting impression

More than any other painter, in my opinion, the great Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–1669) captured in his paintings the essence of his sitter’s soul. Yet to some fine art experts he was an even better engraver than painter. A stunning exhibition entitled Rembrandt in Geneva of some 100 of his etchings at the Domaine de Penthes in Pregny-Chambésy until 23 October offers visitors the chance to decide if they agree with the scholars. Whether or not they do, there’s no doubt that inspired genius pored from Rembrandt’s fingertips.

Olympic Museum Lausanne

Lausanne’s Olympic Museum brings hearts & minds closer to the real thing

If like me you’ve been slow to fully embrace the Olympics Games after an endlessly negative media build-up however legitimate, then I recommend a visit to the Olympic Museum in Lausanne to help you get your Olympic mojo back before they’re over for another four years. Informative, inspiring and just plain fun, I found myself reliving so many special Olympic moments and personal memories from past Games that I came away appreciating all over again what the fuss is all about.

Frankenstein at Bodmer Fdtn Cologny

Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” returns to Cologny 200 years after its birth

The weather on Lake Geneva in June 1816 was especially bad — we know what that’s like lately but rather than climate change being the culprit as it is today, a volcanic eruption in faraway Indonesia was to blame for the storms over Europe that Summer. (Well, in fact, the eruption did evoke catastrophic climate change for years after its eruption leading to widespread crop failure and mass hunger on the continent.) Torrential rain was proving tedious for five young visitors to the area — all exiles from scandal and debt in London — and one of them, their host one sodden evening at his rented digs, the Villa Diodati in Cologny, put down a challenge as a means of distraction: “We will each write a ghost story,” he said. Frankenstein: the first science fiction novel The works resulting from that competition would achieve literary acclaim and over time, none more so than that of 19-year-old Mary Godwin, the lover and soon-to-be wife of the renowned poet Percy Bysshe Shelley who was there along with their host, the infamous Lord Byron and the latter’s personal physician John William Polidori. It took some time for Mary …

vintage poster art

Winter fun for everyone in vintage posters of Swiss alpine sports

Whenever I visit the the Eaux Vives suburb of Geneva, where I lived some eleven years ago, I always take in the display windows of Galerie Un Deux Trois, the only dealers in Switzerland and — after 37 years in business — the oldest in Europe, to trade in the collection, restoration and sale of vintage poster art. There are over 15,000 posters in the collection of owner and renowned vintage-poster expert Jean-Daniel Clerc, some of which date back to the late 1880s and include gems by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Alphonse Mucha. The Galerie has just launched a selling exhibition displaying 25 of its wonderful collection of 260 vintage posters. These are dedicated to winter sports and their associated pastimes, products, and industries (rail and air travel, for example), all of which grew in popularity as the middle classes became more affluent, joining their wealthier counterparts on the slopes. Vintage posters as historical documents The posters chronicle the development of wintertime sports, sports facilities, and the advent of luxury hotels and world-famous resorts over a hundred years. They also mirror changing artistic …