All posts tagged: exhibition

Hollywood Glamour in Carouge: the Photos of Ernest Piccot 1930-1950

Unfortunately, due to Geneva’s current COVID-19 guidelines, Hollywood Glamour in Carouge is closed to public viewing. The Museum hopes to reopen for the exhibition’s final week at the end of March. The original review follows below: There’s a little bit of glamour in all of us. Or so some of us like to think. Usually, that glamour finds expression in private moments as we gaze into the bathroom mirror freshly made up or if we catch our reflection in a storefront window on a particularly good day. For that fleeting moment of satisfaction, a few things have to hit the right notes: the lighting, angle, clothes, mood, props and makeup. Yet rarely in our daily lives do these elements occur simultaneously and in a natural setting. From the 1930s to 1950s, a few fortunate women had all those high notes hit, albeit in the Carouge photo studio of photographer Ernest Piccot. His portraits of local women, their identitites unrecorded and unknown, now make up a retrospective at the Musée de Carouge entitled Elles. In the Lens of …

“Shadows – From the Renaissance to Present Day” illuminates the walls of the Hermitage until 27 October

I have to say I’m very impressed with how the Hermitage Foundation in Lausanne always manages in its exhibitions to include a favourite painting of mine, discovered during my five-year stay as an expat in Hampstead, London. It’s as if they’re reading my mind and I’ll have to tell them how much I appreciate it on my next visit, which is never very long after my last one because their exhibitions consistently distinguish themselves by their quality and diversity.

The Hermitage Foundation starts 2019 at the top with its exhibition “British Painting from Turner to Whistler”

  One of many highlights during my six-year stay in London had to be the proximity of prestigious art museums where the cream of 19th-century British art held pride of place. In particular I enjoyed visiting the Tate Britain on Millbank, which houses the nation’s Turner Collection in addition to beloved works by the Pre-Raphaelites and remarkable portraits by the American painters John Singer Sargent and James Abbott McNeill Whistler. So it’s a huge pleasure to learn that the Hermitage Foundation in Lausanne will continue its run of outstanding art exhibitions with the opening on February 1st of “British Painting from Turner to Whistler”.

Christa de Carouge: a new exhibition at the Musée de Carouge celebrates the life of a beloved fashion designer

Christa de Carouge, “the lady in black”, left a lasting impression on Swiss fashion and made the Geneva suburb of Carouge, whose name she adopted, famous well beyond its borders. Her multifunctional clothes made with graphic designs in luxurious and innovative fabrics bestowed upon those who wore them elegance, freedom and comfort. Celebrated for her professional skills and loved for her personal warmth and humanity, after her sudden death last January the Musée de Carouge decided to recognize her creativity and generosity and to express the gratitude of the city she loved so much with a comprehensive new exhibition.

Images Festival 2018 turns Vevey into an open-air photo museum

I know it’s a little late in the game to be telling you about the outdoor photography exhibition called Festival Images Vevey that since the 8th of this month has taken over the parks, buildings, streets (and even a portion of Lac Leman) of this picturesque city, but with six days still to go before the curtain drops on this biennial event, there’s still time to experience it.

“Manguin” at the Hermitage captures hot Summer Days in vibrant Color

Just as the season for languid, lazy moments has arrived in the Swiss Romandy comes a new exhibition at the Hermitage Foundation in Lausanne that captures the very essence of hot summer days and nights. In Manguin: The voluptuousness of color we see some 100 works — paintings, sketches and watercolors — by the painter Henri Manguin (1874-1949) who indulged his passion for color so ardently the contemporary poet Apollinaire called him the “voluptuous painter”.