All posts filed under: Art & Culture

Canadian impressionist paintings

Post-lockdown agenda: Item No. 1 – Canadian Impressionism at Hermitage

Im kicking myself for ignoring my initial impulse to visit the Hermitage Foundation in Lausane “no matter what” when their current exhibition Canada and Impressionism opened there in late January. Being Canadian and a fanatic for almost all things Impressionism I knew I’d be Impressed (excuse the pun) by the collection of a hundred paintings by Canadian painters, which has been loaned to the Hermitage largely by the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.

“Shadows – From the Renaissance to Present Day” illuminates the walls of the Hermitage until 27 October

I have to say I’m very impressed with how the Hermitage Foundation in Lausanne always manages in its exhibitions to include a favourite painting of mine, discovered during my five-year stay as an expat in Hampstead, London. It’s as if they’re reading my mind and I’ll have to tell them how much I appreciate it on my next visit, which is never very long after my last one because their exhibitions consistently distinguish themselves by their quality and diversity.

Je Suis Invisible! A delightfully fresh take on A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Director Dan Jemmet opens at Le Théatre de Carouge’s La Cuisine

  The new production “Je Suis Invisible!” that opened on 26 March at the Théâtre de Carouge’s impressive temporary venue La Cuisine derives it’s comedic inspiration from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. But its winning, madcap charm owes greatly to the modernised, offbeat interpretation its given by British-born director Dan Jemmett based on an approachable, down-to-earth but still lyrical translation into modern-day French by his longstanding collaborator Mériam Korichi.

The Hermitage Foundation starts 2019 at the top with its exhibition “British Painting from Turner to Whistler”

  One of many highlights during my six-year stay in London had to be the proximity of prestigious art museums where the cream of 19th-century British art held pride of place. In particular I enjoyed visiting the Tate Britain on Millbank, which houses the nation’s Turner Collection in addition to beloved works by the Pre-Raphaelites and remarkable portraits by the American painters John Singer Sargent and James Abbott McNeill Whistler. So it’s a huge pleasure to learn that the Hermitage Foundation in Lausanne will continue its run of outstanding art exhibitions with the opening on February 1st of “British Painting from Turner to Whistler”.